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A Symposium on Drug Discovery for the Brain


  • To bring together researchers on brain diseases from Virginia universities, research institutes, and pharmaceutical companies to highlight the challenges and opportunities for drug discovery in the Commonwealth for targeting brain diseases.
  • To facilitate interactions among all participants so as to stimulate collaborative brain research between Virginia universities, research institutes, and the pharmaceutical industry.
Other information
  • The registration fee includes a banquet on Monday, breakfast and lunch on Tuesday, and all breaks.
  • Poster sessions on both days will allow registrants to display their research and connect with colleagues. We welcome posters on all aspects of neuroscience (i.e. not just drug discovery) and posters on all aspects of drug discovery & delivery (i.e. not just brain/CNS).
  • Deadline for poster abstract submission is May 11; see below for details
  • Registration (includes banquet, breakfast, and lunch) :
    • $100 Researchers $50 Students before May 13
    • $150 Researchers $75 Students after May 13
Poster Abstract Submission
Schedule
 
For more information please contact
 
Paul R. Carlier
Professor, Department of
Chemistry & Deputy Director,
Virginia Tech Center for Drug
Discovery, Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061
email: pcarlier@vt.edu
Tel. 540-231-9219
 
 
Richard A. Glennon
Alfred and Frances Burger
Distinguished Professor of Medicinal Chemistry,
Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Virginia
Commonwealth University
Richmond, VA 23298-0540
email: glennon@vcu.edu
Tel. 804-828-8487

 
John S. Lazo
Harrison Distinguished Professor
Departments of Pharmacology & Chemistry
Director, Fiske Drug Discovery Laboratory
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22908
email: lazo@virginia.edu
telephone: (434)-243-1936 
 
 
David G. I. Kingston
University Distinguished Professor,
Department of Chemistry & Director,
Virginia Tech Center for Drug Discovery,
Virginia Tech
Blacksburg, VA 24061
email: dkingsto@vt.edu
Tel. 540-231-6570

 
 
 
        Address: 100 South 12th Street, Richmond, Virginia, 23219
        Phone: (804) 344-7000
        The Omni Richmond Hotel welcomes you!  We have provided special rates for your stay.  See more at: http://www.omnihotels.com/hotels/richmond/meetings/virginia-brain-rx
 

Date: May 23, 2016 08:00 AM - May 24, 2016 05:00 PM

Fee

$150.00

Registration closes on May 19, 2016 12:00 AM

Target Audience(s)

  • Structural Biologist
  • Pharmacologist
  • Neuroscientist
  • Medicinal Chemist
  • Drug Development Scientist
  • Computational Chemist
  • Researchers
  • Students

Support/Credits

Keynote Speakers
 

Please choose a Fee Type from the Drop Down Menu Below:
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Registration closes on May 19, 2016 at 12:00 AM

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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 11:00 AM - 05:30 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 11:00 PM - 01:00 PM
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Welcome from David G. I. Kingston, Ph.D. (VT), Meeting Chair
Welcome from VPRs (or designees) of participating universities 
Welcome from VBHRC/The Catalyst:  Mike Grisham (Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corporation).
Date: 05/23/16
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:15 PM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

David Cifu, M.D.
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, VCU

George Bloom picture

George Bloom, Ph.D.
Professor, Biology and Cell Biology, UVA


Brief Bio : Research in our laboratory is now focused primarily on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The histopathological hallmark of AD is the presence in brain of extracellular plaques of ß-amyloid peptide fibrils, and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, which are filaments composed of the protein, tau. Despite the conspicuous appearance of plaques and tangles, a growing body of evidence points to their building blocks, ß-amyloid and tau oligomers, as being the toxic molecular species that cause AD. For example, we have found that tau expression is required for several adverse effects of ß-amyloid oligomers on neurons, including microtubules loss, ectopic re-rentry into the cell cycle and cytotoxicity. The goals of our work are to decipher the metabolic links that connect ß-amyloid and tau to damage neurons, to define the structures and pathological properties of various types of ß-amyloid and tau oligomers, and to develop effective therapeutic and diagnostic tools for AD.

Mike Friedlander, Ph.D.
Virginia Tech, Carilion Research Institute

Date: 05/23/16
Time: 01:15 PM - 01:30 PM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Phil Skolnick picture

Phil Skolnick
Director, DPMCDA, NIDA, NIH


Brief Bio : Dr. Phil Skolnick has joined NIDA as director of the Division of Pharmacotherapies and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse. Dr. Skolnick, who has extensive experience in corporate and academic drug research, will lead a NIDA team that stimulates and conducts all phases of medications development and supports clinical trial infrastructure. Photo of Dr. Phil Skolnick "We are delighted to have Dr. Skolnick join our team of scientists looking for solutions to the management of drug addiction," says NIDA Director Dr. Nora D. Volkow. "His many remarkable years of innovation and leadership in both public and private research arenas will strengthen our complex medications development process and enhance our search for pharmacotherapeutic and immunological treatment agents." Prior to joining NIDA, Dr. Skolnick was a research professor of psychiatry at New York University Langone Medical Center. He served as chief scientific officer at DOV Pharmaceutical, Inc., from 2001 to 2009 and led the discovery and development of compounds that may ultimately help treat a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. Dr. Skolnick's appointment marks a return to the National Institutes of Health, which he first joined in 1972 as a staff fellow and in which he later held various leadership positions in neurobiology and neuroscience. Dr. Skolnick left government service in 1997 when he accepted a position in the private sector at Eli Lilly. "I am delighted to return to the NIH community, which was a wonderful professional home for 25 years," says Dr. Skolnick. "My new position at NIDA will enable me to take what I have learned in the private sector about medications development and apply it to the challenging field of drug abuse and addiction."
Date: 05/23/16
Time: 01:30 PM - 02:05 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 02:05 PM - 02:15 PM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Darryle Schoepp, Ph.D.
V.P. and Therapeutic Area Head, Neuroscience, Merck


Brief Bio : WHITEHOUSE STATION, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Merck & Co., Inc. announced today that Darryle D. Schoepp, Ph.D. has been named senior vice president and franchise head, Neuroscience, Merck Research Laboratories (MRL). Dr. Schoepp assumes his new role on March 5th and will report to Peter S. Kim, Ph.D., president, MRL. “I join Peter Kim in expressing how pleased we are that a scientist of Dr. Schoepp's distinction is joining the MRL team in this key leadership role” Tweet this “Darryle Schoepp is among the world's most outstanding drug discovery scientists, and we are delighted to have a leader of his stature join the MRL team,” Dr. Kim said. “The depth and breadth of his expertise across neuroscience research will greatly enhance the franchise-based research strategy that we have been implementing within MRL.” Dr. Schoepp, 51, comes to MRL after 20 years in neuroscience discovery research at Eli Lilly and Company, where for the past three years he has served as vice president and overall global head of neuroscience research and early clinical investigation. In that role, he formulated the company's neuroscience strategy and expanded the research emphasis in Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and pain. He and his team were responsible for delivering a number of highly novel drug candidates now in clinical development. At Merck, Dr. Schoepp will have overall responsibility for scientific direction across the drug discovery and development process for neuroscience, including Merck’s priority research areas of Alzheimer's disease, pain and sleep disorders. He will be based at the Merck facility in Upper Gwynedd, PA. “I join Peter Kim in expressing how pleased we are that a scientist of Dr. Schoepp's distinction is joining the MRL team in this key leadership role,” said Richard T. Clark, chief executive officer and president, Merck. “I am confident that Dr. Schoepp will make outstanding contributions to neuroscience research and play a role in continuing Merck’s proud history of developing innovative new medicines that improve health and the quality of lives around the world.” Dr. Schoepp received his bachelor's degree in Pharmacy from North Dakota State University and his doctoral degree in Pharmacology and Toxicology from West Virginia University. He conducted postdoctoral research in Pharmacology and Toxicology at the University of Kansas. He is recognized for having made major contributions in the investigation of the excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter glutamate in disease pathophysiology, pharmacology and therapeutics. He led early and current efforts to discover agents that act at the receptor level to activate, antagonize, or allosterically modulate excitatory amino acid neuronal transmission. With his colleagues at Lilly, Dr. Schoepp discovered many novel compounds that entered clinical development for the management of pain, migraine, epilepsy, anxiety, schizophrenia and neurodegenerative diseases. Most recently, his research has been focused on discovery of receptor agonists, antagonists and modulators in studying the role of glutamate regulation in psychiatric illnesses. In 2002, Dr. Schoepp was honored with the Pharmacia / American Society for Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET) Award for Experimental Therapeutics for his research on the experimental therapeutics of metabotropic glutamate receptors. He has organized and participated in numerous international meetings and symposia, published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and is the inventor of multiple patents in the glutamate area. He serves on the Basic Pharmacology Executive Committee of the Pharmaceutical Manufacturers Foundation, on the Board of Publication Trustees for ASPET and as Executive Editor for the journal Neuropharmacology. He is a member of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP).
Date: 05/23/16
Time: 02:15 PM - 02:55 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 02:55 PM - 03:00 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 03:00 PM - 03:30 PM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Craig W. Lindsley picture

Craig W. Lindsley, Ph.D.
Co-director, Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery


Brief Bio : Craig Lindsley received his Ph.D. degree in chemistry in 1996 from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in the Lipshutz laboratory developing novel bi-directional organometallic linchpins for all-E polyene synthesis. Then as an ICCB (Institute of Chemistry and Cell Biology) postdoctoral fellow in the labs of Prof. Matt Shair at Harvard University, he developed a solid phase biomimetic synthesis of carpanone-like molecules. After brief stints at Parke-Davis and Eli Lilly, Dr. Lindsley joined the Medicinal Chemistry Department at Merck and Company in West Point, PA. Merck where he established and led the Technology Enabled Synthesis (TES) group as a senior research fellow/group leader. By application of an iterative parallel synthesis approach in combination with microwave synthesis technology and a custom, mass-directed preparative LCMS platform, Dr. Lindsley's TES group rapidly developed proof of concept compounds for nascent programs as well as four preclinical candidates with only 1-2 chemists/project. During his six years at Merck, Dr. Lindsley delivered six preclinical development candidates for cancer and neuroscience programs. In 2006, Dr. Lindsley joined the faculty of the Vanderbilt University to direct the medicinal chemistry efforts of the Vanderbilt Center for Neuroscience Drug Discovery, with a primary mission of facilitating translation of recent advances in basic science to novel therapeutics. Dr. Lindsley is Associate Editor of Current Topics in Medicinal Chemistry and serves on the editorial boards of two other international journals. He serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the NIH National Chemical Genomics Center, and is a worldwide medicinal chemistry consultant for Amgen. Dr. Lindsley's current research is focused on development of novel treatment strategies for schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, and other brain disorders.
Date: 05/23/16
Time: 03:30 PM - 04:10 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 04:10 PM - 04:15 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 04:15 PM - 05:15 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 05:15 PM - 05:30 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 05:30 PM - 06:30 PM
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Date: 05/23/16
Time: 06:30 PM - 07:30 PM
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Registration closes on May 19, 2016 at 12:00 AM

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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 09:00 AM - 02:55 PM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 08:00 AM - 09:00 AM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 09:00 AM - 09:05 AM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Todd Sherer picture

Todd Sherer, Ph.D.
CEO, Michael J. Fox Foundation


Brief Bio : Todd Sherer, PhD, is the Chief Executive Officer of The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF), reporting to the Board of Directors. Formally trained as a neuroscientist, he directs the organization's research strategy and is responsible for the organization's overall scientific and fundraising direction to speed treatment breakthroughs and a cure for Parkinson's disease. Dr. Sherer has been a key architect of the Foundation's strategy to define high-priority research areas for Parkinson's disease - therapeutic targets and approaches that are closest or most critical to practical relevance in patients' daily lives - in order to leverage donor-raised capital to push projects in these areas toward the clinic. He has played a major role in the Foundation's efforts to increase the pharmaceutical industry's investment in Parkinson's disease drug development and engage the patient community to encourage and expand participation in clinical research. Today he is one of the world's foremost experts on the science and business of Parkinson's drug development, speaking frequently on these topics at conferences, to the media and to members of the Parkinson's community. Dr. Sherer's work with the Foundation began in 2003, when, as a postdoctoral fellow at Emory University in Atlanta, he was awarded MJFF funding to investigate the role of environmental factors in Parkinson's disease. He joined the Foundation's staff full time as Associate Director, Research Programs, in April 2004. He was promoted to Vice President, Research Programs, in June 2006 and Chief Program Officer in November 2010, finally assuming the role of Chief Executive Officer in May 2011. Dr. Sherer is a member of the Board of Directors of the Parkinson's Action Network and participates in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies Forum on Neuroscience and Nervous System Disorders. He is a collaborating scientist for the Coalition Against Major Diseases (CAMD) and a member of the CINAPS Advisory Committee at the National Institute for Neurodegenerative Disease and Stroke, National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Sherer also serves on the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) Council and the Cures Acceleration Network Review Board at the NIH. Additionally, Dr. Sherer was selected to serve as a council member on FasterCures' TRAIN (The Research Acceleration and Innovation Network) program. During his career as a bench researcher, Dr. Sherer published over 30 peer-reviewed articles in scientific journals. He earned his PhD in Neuroscience from the University of Virginia and holds a BS in Psychology from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina.
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 09:10 AM - 09:45 AM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 09:45 AM - 09:50 AM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

George Bloom picture

George Bloom, Ph.D.
Professor, Biology and Cell Biology, UVA


Brief Bio : Research in our laboratory is now focused primarily on Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The histopathological hallmark of AD is the presence in brain of extracellular plaques of ß-amyloid peptide fibrils, and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles, which are filaments composed of the protein, tau. Despite the conspicuous appearance of plaques and tangles, a growing body of evidence points to their building blocks, ß-amyloid and tau oligomers, as being the toxic molecular species that cause AD. For example, we have found that tau expression is required for several adverse effects of ß-amyloid oligomers on neurons, including microtubules loss, ectopic re-rentry into the cell cycle and cytotoxicity. The goals of our work are to decipher the metabolic links that connect ß-amyloid and tau to damage neurons, to define the structures and pathological properties of various types of ß-amyloid and tau oligomers, and to develop effective therapeutic and diagnostic tools for AD.
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 09:50 AM - 10:05 AM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

B. Frank Gupton picture

B. Frank Gupton, Ph.D.
Chair and Professor, Chemical and Life Science Engineering, VCU


Brief Bio : The Gupton research group is focused on the development and application of new technologies that will streamline organic synthesis through process intensification. The goal of process intensification is to increase the overall efficiency and selectivity of chemical reactions by using novel chemistry and/ or running reactions under more extreme process conditions (temperature and pressure). We are interested in applying these principals towards the development of new catalyst systems that can be used in concert with continuous chemical processing (flow reactor technology) to streamline the synthesis of pharmaceutical active ingredients (API’s). We have developed a series of palladium catalyst systems that can be used in cross-coupling reactions for batch and continuous operations and we are currently using these catalysts in the preparation of several API target molecules. These catalysts are composed of metal nanoparticles supported on novel carbon-based platforms such as graphene or carbon nanotubes. Our group has direct access to a wide variety of surface characterization methodologies to characterize these materials which have provided fundamental insights into their unusual catalytic activity. We are also actively involved in the evaluation and integration of continuous analytical methodologies with continuous chemical processing in order to provide real time feedback and optimization of our processes.
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 10:05 AM - 10:20 AM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Harald Sontheimer picture

Harald Sontheimer, Ph.D.
Director, Neuroscience Program, Virginia Tech


Brief Bio : BLACKSBURG, Va., April 29, 2015 – Harald Sontheimer, a professor of neurobiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and a nationally recognized neuroscientist and expert on the biology of glial cells, the brain’s most abundant cell type, will direct a university-wide neuroscience initiative being launched within Virginia Tech's College of Science. Established last year, the neuroscience initiative is an interdisciplinary program based in the College of Science's Academy of Integrated Science. Starting this fall, undergraduate students at Virginia Tech may declare neuroscience as their academic major. The initiative will also include the recruitment of multiple new neuroscience faculty members to Virginia Tech’s Blacksburg campus. In addition to his appointment as a professor in the College of Science, Sontheimer will join the faculty at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. There he will oversee his own research laboratory and direct the institute’s new Glial Biology in Health, Disease, and Cancer Center and those of other new faculty members who will be recruited to the center. “The recruitment of Dr. Harald Sontheimer represents a significant development for Virginia Tech,” said Lay Nam Chang, dean of the College of Science. “The new neuroscience initiative has attracted a huge amount of interest among students and faculty. Dr. Sontheimer will now lead this effort with a goal of making our program the destination for students, faculty and scholars from all over the world who wish to study neuroscience. The Virginia Tech program will lay the foundation for an understanding of the workings of the human neurological system, from the cellular level, to an appreciation to all that is essential to the human mind, Chang said. “It will therefore stretch from biological foundations, to cognition, leading to decision making, risk assessment and management, philosophical thinking, and creativity,” added Chang. “As such, it is unique among all such programs that are extant. It will also involve scholarship spanning disciplines across the university. Dr. Sontheimer's passion for teaching, research, and his breadth of scholarship are crucial for providing the leadership for this enterprise.” For the past two decades at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Sontheimer has led several major programs, including the Civitan International Research Center on Intellectual Disabilities and the world’s first Center for Glial Biology in Medicine. Sontheimer is credited with making foundational discoveries on the functional properties of glial cells in the brain, including the localization and mechanisms of a range of receptors and ion channels that had previously been thought to exist only on nerve cells. Sontheimer’s work on the fundamental properties of glial cells led to his discovery of a major new therapeutic approach for the treatment of glioblastoma, the deadliest and most prevalent primary brain tumor in humans. He identified from scorpion venom a naturally occurring compound, chlorotoxin, which has the peculiar ability to interact specifically with a protein expressed only on the surface of glial cells that have transformed to the malignant state. He determined that this molecule could prevent the spread of brain tumor cells beyond the original site of malignancy. Building on this research, Sontheimer founded a company, TransMolecular, Inc. (later acquired by Morphotek Inc.), which successfully synthesized the chlorotoxin molecule for use in human clinical trials. The neuroscience biotechnology company received several patents and went on to lead a series of clinical trials. At Virginia Tech, Sontheimer will continue his research to develop new interventions and therapeutics and to investigate the mechanisms underlying glial cell function in health, normal brain development, and disease, including brain tumors. He will collaborate with research teams already studying glioblastoma at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and across the Blacksburg campus. “We are extremely fortunate to have recruited Dr. Sontheimer to Virginia Tech,” said Michael Friedlander, executive director of the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute and Virginia Tech’s associate provost for health sciences. “He is truly one of the pioneers of basic neuroscience, and someone who has contributed profoundly to the treatment of a devastating human disease. He is also a passionate, dedicated, and highly innovative educator, as well as a true scholar of the highest integrity. He inspires confidence, trust, and enthusiasm in all who work with him.” Also instrumental in recruiting Sontheimer were Kirby Deater-Deckard, a professor of psychology who has served as the neuroscience program director since its inception; Ignacio Moore, an associate professor of biological sciences who has been involved with development of the neuroscience program; and J. P. Morgan, director of the Academy of Integrated Science and associate dean for strategic initiatives in the College of Science. Beyond his research and scientific leadership, Sontheimer is also renowned for his innovative teaching and curriculum development for undergraduate, graduate, and medical students. He is a past director of the University of Alabama at Birmingham’s interdepartmental graduate program in cell, molecular, and developmental biology, and he runs the university’s highly acclaimed undergraduate neuroscience course in brain disorders. Sontheimer recently used a sabbatical to write a comprehensive textbook for undergraduate neuroscience students on diseases of the nervous system. “Harald Sontheimer brings the all-important triad of innovative research, memorable teaching, and interdisciplinary excellence to our university,” said Mark G. McNamee, senior vice president and provost of Virginia Tech. “His enthusiasm for our mission is matched only by our enthusiasm for his scientific and educational talents.” Sontheimer earned his doctoral degree in cell biology and biophysics from the University of Heidelberg in 1989. He undertook postdoctoral training at the Yale School of Medicine, where he later served as an assistant professor of neurology and neurobiology from 1991 to 1994. Sontheimer serves on the scientific advisory boards of the Max Planck Society, The MIT Press, and CURE Epilepsy. He has published more than 150 original research articles, including recent ones in Nature and Nature Neuroscience Reviews, with a forthcoming article in Science Translational Medicine.
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 10:20 AM - 10:35 AM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 10:35 AM - 11:00 AM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 11:00 AM - 11:15 AM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 11:45 AM - 12:00 PM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 12:00 PM - 01:00 PM
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Speaker(s)/Author(s)

Thomas Laughren, M.D.
Director, Regulatory Affairs, MGH Clinical Trials Network and Institute


Brief Bio : In addition to his position at MGH, Dr. Laughren is currently a consultant in psychiatric drug development in several other settings as well. He is recently retired as Division Director for the Division of Psychiatry Products, Center for Drug Evaluation and Research at FDA. Prior to coming to FDA in September, 1983, Dr. Laughren was affiliated with the VA Medical Center in Providence, RI, and was on the faculty of the Brown University Program in Medicine. He received his medical degree from the University of Wisconsin in Madison, Wisconsin, and also completed residency training in psychiatry at the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Laughren is board certified in general psychiatry. As Division Director for the Division of Psychiatry Products, Dr. Laughren oversaw the review of all psychiatric drug development activities conducted under INDs and the review of all NDAs and supplements for new psychiatric drug claims. He has authored and co-authored many papers and book chapters on regulatory and methodological issues pertaining to the development of psychiatric drugs, and is a frequent speaker at professional meetings on these same topics. Dr. Laughren has received numerous awards for his regulatory accomplishments.
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 01:00 PM - 01:45 PM
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Mike Grisham (VBHRC), Moderator
Michael Wood (AstraZeneca), Designee TBA (Lilly), Designee TBA (Pfizer).
Date: 05/24/16
Time: 01:45 PM - 02:55 PM
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Date: 05/24/16
Time: 02:55 PM - 03:15 PM
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